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Prepared by the
Institute for the Analysis of Global Security

August 13, 2004
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Energy Security Current Issue

What the 9/11 Commission missed
One of the main conclusions of the 9/11 Commission is that in order for the U.S. to prevail in the war on terror it must develop a multidisciplinary, comprehensive, and balanced strategy, which integrates diplomacy, intelligence, covert action, law-enforcement, economic policy, foreign aid, homeland defense, and military strength. IAGS' Gal Luft argues that a key component is missing.

The Connection: Water and Energy Security
Allan Hoffman, former associate and acting deputy assistant secretary for Utility Technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the DOE and IAGS Advisor, explains why water and energy security are inextricably linked.

Watch

Saudi Arabia in Crisis
IAGS' Anne Korin presented a strategy for reducing U.S. dependence on Saudi oil as part of a conference hosted by the Hudson Institute on July 9, 2004. Watch the event (Anne's presentation starts at 02:38:35.)

Energy Security in East Asia
The outlook for energy security in the Asia-Pacific looks particularly troubling, with rising levels of oil consumption and an even stronger rise in demand. IAGS Research Associate Richard Giragosian analyzes the energy security risks faced by the region and the agreements and strategies adopted by Japan, South Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines in response.

On the technology front How utilities can save America from its oil addiction
Utility companies which have traditionally viewed themselves as providers of "power" for lighting homes or powering computers, can now break the dominance of Big Oil in the transportation energy sector and introduce much needed competition in the transportation fuel market. Gal Luft explains how.



Comparing Hydrogen and Electricity for Transmission, Storage and Transportation


Study: Coal based methanol is cheapest fuel for fuel cells
A recently completed study by University of Florida researchers for the Georgetown University fuel cell program assessed the the future overall costs of various fuel options for fuel cell vehicles. The primary fuel options analyzed by the study were hydrogen from natural gas, hydrogen from coal, and methanol from coal. The study concluded that methanol from coal was the cheapest option, by a factor of almost 50%.



Major improvement in fuel economy and range of Honda's fuel cell vehicles
The 2005 model Honda fuel cell vehicle achieves a nearly 20 percent improvement in its EPA fuel economy rating and a 33 percent gain in peak power (107 hp vs. 80 hp) compared to the 2004 model, and feature a number of important technological achievements on the road to commercialization of fuel cell vehicles.

Biodiesel fueled ships to cruise in Canada
A Canadian project will test the use of pure biodiesel (B100) as a fuel supply on a fleet of 12 boats of various types and sizes, 11 boats on pure biodiesel (B100) and one on a 5-percent blend (B5).


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Property of The Institute for the Analysis of Global Security 2003. All rights reserved.

Back Issues

Major improvement in fuel economy and range of Honda's fuel cell vehicles

The 2005 Honda FCX, Honda's second-generation fuel cell vehicle (FCV) and the first to be powered by a Honda designed and manufactured fuel cell stack, has been certified by both the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) for commercial use. The 2005 model FCX achieves a nearly 20 percent improvement in its EPA fuel economy rating and a 33 percent gain in peak power (107 hp vs. 80 hp) compared to the 2004 FCX.

With an EPA city/highway rating of 62/51 miles per kg of hydrogen (mpkg) and a EPA-rated driving range of 190 miles, the hydrogen powered FCX delivers nearly a 20 percent improvement in fuel efficiency and range versus the 2004 model with an EPA rating of 51/46 mpkg and a range of 160 miles. In terms of energy efficiency, one mile per kilogram of hydrogen is almost equivalent to one mile per gallon (mpg) of gasoline. The hydrogen-powered Honda FCX has been certified by CARB as a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) and by the EPA as a Tier-2 Bin 1 National Low Emission Vehicle (NLEV), the lowest possible national emission rating.

The Honda FC Stack also provides for increased range and performance while significantly reducing the cost and complexity of the fuel cell system.

This newly certified Honda fuel cell vehicle and Honda FC Stack feature a number of important technological achievements on the road to commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Most significantly, the Honda FC stack is capable of starting in temperatures as low as -20.C (-4.F) while also demonstrating improved high temperature capability. Utilizing a new fuel cell structure made of stamped metal separators and new aromatic membrane material, the Honda FC stack features 50 percent fewer components and provides for easier manufacturability compared to an earlier prototype Honda stack design.
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